BREAKING: REI CLEVELAND STRIKE MOVES COMPANY TO NEGOTIATE ELECTION AGREEMENT MINUTES BEFORE NLRB HEARING

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 3, 2023 Contact: Chelsea Connor | [email protected] | 347-866-6259 BREAKING: REI CLEVELAND STRIKE MOVES COMPANY TO NEGOTIATE ELECTION AGREEMENT MINUTES BEFORE NLRB HEARING  - UNION ELECTION WILL MOVE AHEAD ON MARCH 3, 2023 WITH ALL NLRA ELIGIBLE WORKERS - A COMPLETE REVERSAL OF REI’S INITIAL POSITION (CLEVELAND, OH) – Today, at 1:30 PM ET, REI agreed to terms of an election agreement with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) and the Cleveland office of the NLRB. The agreement was met immediately following workers walking out this morning on a ULP strike demanding the right to vote in a free and fair NLRB election and for the company to stop its unlawful surveillance of workers. The workers intend to unconditionally return to work this afternoon. The agreement includes all NLRA eligible workers at the Ohio store, a reversal from REI’s position last week. The union election will take place on March 3, 2023 from 12:00 PM - 6:00 PM ET at the Ohio store.  ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND: As background, please see Monday's statement from the Union, Tuesday's media briefing recording with workers, Thursday's ULP filing and letter from U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown, and today’s strike announcement. Videos and photos of the walkout can be seen and used by the media (Photo/Video Credit: RWDSU) here.  The worker-led unionization effort in the Beachwood suburb of Cleveland, Ohio has been underway for well over a year, but workers cite the overwhelming win at REI, Inc. in SoHo, New York as having put the “battery in our backs” to push to a majority of card signers and file for election. On January 11, 2023, a delegation of REI, Inc. workers at the Ohio store formally filed for a union election with Region 8 of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) seeking representation with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU). This came on the heels of two stores winning their union elections in both the flagship SoHo, New York and in Berkeley, California stores. Despite REI, Inc.'s every effort to union bust coast-to-coast, workers yet again filed for a union election in Ohio.  Workers at the Ohio store hoped they wouldn't need to endure the same union busting campaign their colleagues on the coasts did, but union busting has already begun at the store, with workers being asked to join meetings as much as twice a day.  Last week, REI, Inc. refused to reach a Stipulated Agreement with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) to move ahead with a union election at the Ohio store. The Cleveland office of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) commenced a hearing today, Friday, February 3, 2023. The hearing process, which can prove to be a lengthy distraction and delay, stifling workers' voices, is something workers did not have to endure during the prior two REI, Inc. union elections. The outcome, which may not come for weeks, delaying the election, will determine, if, when and how workers can proceed.  The Union seeks to represent all non-supervisory employees at the store, a presumptively appropriate bargaining unit. But REI has put forth meritless assertions to delay the election. First, REI claims that sales leads are supervisors under the law and therefore cannot unionize; second, that workers in the shop section of the store do not share a community of interest with the store’s retail workers; and third, that certain workers are “casual” employees and shouldn’t vote.  RWDSU vehemently disagrees with REI’s objections. It is especially galling because, as the Company unnecessarily fights RWDSU in Ohio, it is currently bargaining contracts with workers holding these same classifications at the SoHo, New York and Berkley, California stores. REI’s hypocrisy is union-busting plain and simple and is a meek attempt to exclude more than half of the proposed bargaining unit to be eligible to vote. REI also seeks to dismiss the Union’s election petition outright, citing an NLRB case from 1962 involving a union election in the South where the employer made inflammatory racial appeals against unionization. How this has any relationship to the Union’s petition in Ohio in 2023 is anyone’s guess, but RWDSU is incensed that REI would make such an implication in its NLRB filing and minimize both the racial and labor struggles in the South during that time period. When successful, the RWDSU will represent approximately 55 current NLRA eligible workers in the Beachwood, Ohio store in contract negotiations. The store currently operates at a 60% staffing level of its full capacity, potentially increasing that number to over 70. The Union seeks to represent all non-supervisory employees at the store, which includes all full- and part-time sales specialists, technical specialists, visual presentation specialists, shipping and receiving specialists, certified technicians and mechanics, operations leads, sales leads, and shipping and receiving leads. # # # The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) represents 100,000 members throughout the United States, including 45,000 in New York State. The RWDSU is affiliated with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW). For more information, please visit our website at www.rwdsu.org, Facebook:/RWDSU.UFCW Twitter:@RWDSU.

BREAKING: REI UNION CLEVELAND WORKERS WALK OUT IN ULP STRIKE, SHUTTERING STORE AS NEEDLESS HEARING GETS UNDERWAY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 3, 2023 Contact: Chelsea Connor | [email protected] | 347-866-6259 BREAKING: REI UNION CLEVELAND WORKERS WALK OUT IN ULP STRIKE, SHUTTERING STORE AS NEEDLESS HEARING GETS UNDERWAY  REI Seeks Removal of Over Half of NLRA Eligible Bargaining Unit Members and to Dismiss Election in its Entirety in Hearing Which Commenced Today (CLEVELAND, OH) – Today, at 9:45 AM ET, workers at the Beachwood, Ohio REI store in a Cleveland suburb walked out on an Unfair Labor Practice (ULP) strike as their NLRB hearing got underway. In unilateral solidarity, workers left their shifts demanding the right to vote in a free and fair NLRB election and for the company to stop its union busting.  [NEWS: ON TWITTER] NOTES: Workers will be making themselves available to the media throughout the duration of the strike. Additional videos and photos of the walkout can be seen and used by the media (Photo/Video Credit: RWDSU) here.  ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND: As background, please see Monday's statement from the Union, Tuesday's media briefing recording with workers, and Thursday's ULP filing and letter from U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown.  The worker-led unionization effort in the Beachwood suburb of Cleveland, Ohio has been underway for well over a year, but workers cite the overwhelming win at REI, Inc. in SoHo, New York as having put the “battery in our backs” to push to a majority of card signers and file for election. On January 11, 2023, a delegation of REI, Inc. workers at the Ohio store formally filed for a union election with Region 8 of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) seeking representation with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU). This came on the heels of two stores winning their union elections in both the flagship SoHo, New York and in Berkeley, California stores. Despite REI, Inc.'s every effort to union bust coast-to-coast, workers yet again filed for a union election in Ohio.  Workers at the Ohio store hoped they wouldn't need to endure the same union busting campaign their colleagues on the coasts did, but union busting has already begun at the store, with workers being asked to join meetings as much as twice a day.  Last week, REI, Inc. refused to reach a Stipulated Agreement with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) to move ahead with a union election at the Ohio store. The Cleveland office of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) commenced a hearing today, Friday, February 3, 2023. The hearing process, which can prove to be a lengthy distraction and delay, stifling workers' voices, is something workers did not have to endure during the prior two REI, Inc. union elections. The outcome, which may not come for weeks, delaying the election, will determine, if, when and how workers can proceed.  The Union seeks to represent all non-supervisory employees at the store, a presumptively appropriate bargaining unit. But REI has put forth meritless assertions to delay the election. First, REI claims that sales leads are supervisors under the law and therefore cannot unionize; second, that workers in the shop section of the store do not share a community of interest with the store’s retail workers; and third, that certain workers are “casual” employees and shouldn’t vote.  RWDSU vehemently disagrees with REI’s objections. It is especially galling because, as the Company unnecessarily fights RWDSU in Ohio, it is currently bargaining contracts with workers holding these same classifications at the SoHo, New York and Berkley, California stores. REI’s hypocrisy is union-busting plain and simple and is a meek attempt to exclude more than half of the proposed bargaining unit to be eligible to vote. REI also seeks to dismiss the Union’s election petition outright, citing an NLRB case from 1962 involving a union election in the South where the employer made inflammatory racial appeals against unionization. How this has any relationship to the Union’s petition in Ohio in 2023 is anyone’s guess, but RWDSU is incensed that REI would make such an implication in its NLRB filing and minimize both the racial and labor struggles in the South during that time period. When successful, the RWDSU will represent approximately 55 current NLRA eligible workers in the Beachwood, Ohio store in contract negotiations. The store currently operates at a 60% staffing level of its full capacity, potentially increasing that number to over 70. The Union seeks to represent all non-supervisory employees at the store, which includes all full- and part-time sales specialists, technical specialists, visual presentation specialists, shipping and receiving specialists, certified technicians and mechanics, operations leads, sales leads, and shipping and receiving leads. # # # The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) represents 100,000 members throughout the United States, including 45,000 in New York State. The RWDSU is affiliated with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW). For more information, please visit our website at www.rwdsu.org, Facebook:/RWDSU.UFCW Twitter:@RWDSU.

REI SEEKS DELAY OF CLEVELAND, OHIO WORKERS UNION ELECTION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 30, 2023 Contact: Chelsea Connor | [email protected] | 347-866-6259 REI SEEKS DELAY OF CLEVELAND, OHIO WORKERS UNION ELECTION - CONTRARY TO ITS ACTIONS DURING THE ELECTIONS IN ITS NEW YORK CITY AND BERKELEY, CA STORES, COMPANY DEMANDS REMOVAL OF BARGAINING UNIT CLASSIFICATIONS, WHICH COMPRISE OVER HALF OF THE NLRA ELIGIBLE VOTERS (CLEVELAND, OH) – Late last week, REI, Inc. refused to reach a Stipulated Agreement with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) to move ahead with a union election at its store in Beachwood, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. The refusal means the election cannot proceed swiftly, and as such, the Cleveland office of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has set a hearing to begin on Friday, February 3, 2023. The hearing process can prove to be a lengthy distraction and delay, stifling workers' voices, something workers did not have to endure during the prior two REI, Inc. union elections. The Union seeks to represent all non-supervisory employees at the store, a presumptively appropriate bargaining unit. But REI has put forth meritless assertions to delay the election. First, REI claims that sales leads are supervisors under the law and therefore cannot unionize; second, that workers in the shop section of the store do not share a community of interest with the store’s retail workers; and third, that certain workers are “casual” employees and shouldn’t vote.  RWDSU vehemently disagrees with REI’s objections. It is especially galling because, as the Company unnecessarily fights RWDSU in Ohio, it is currently bargaining contracts with workers holding these same classifications at the SoHo, New York and Berkley, California stores. REI’s hypocrisy is union-busting plain and simple and is a meek attempt to exclude more than half of the proposed bargaining unit to be eligible to vote. REI also seeks to dismiss the Union’s election petition outright, citing an NLRB case from 1962 involving a union election in the South where the employer made inflammatory racial appeals against unionization. How this has any relationship to the Union’s petition in Ohio in 2023 is anyone’s guess, but RWDSU is incensed that REI would make such an implication in its NLRB filing and minimize both the racial and labor struggles in the South during that time period. “REI, Inc.’s request to bar clearly eligible workers from voting for their union is union busting on its face. And it’s nothing but a feeble attempt to delay the union election – period. It cannot be clearer that REI’s motion to remove previously eligible job classifications from this election only seeks to silence workers' voices. And these are not just any workers’ voices, these are the voices of workers with the same job classifications who are already being heard at bargaining tables on both coasts. You cannot be in support of union elections and freedom of speech, and then bar more than half of your workers from voting. Let the workers at REI in Ohio have the same opportunity you gave workers on the coasts. Let workers vote, and stop these baseless delay tactics,” said Stuart Appelbaum, President of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU).  REI, Inc. still has time to reach a Stipulated Agreement with the RWDSU before the hearing begins. The Union will continue to seek a Stipulated Agreement in order for workers to swiftly have their voices heard, without delay. It must be emphasized that REI has reached stipulated election agreements at two other stores prior to the Union’s petition in Ohio. ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND:  The worker-led unionization effort in the Beachwood suburb of Cleveland, Ohio has been underway for well over a year, but workers cite the overwhelming win at REI, Inc. in SoHo, New York as having put the “battery in our backs” to push to a majority of card signers and file for election. On January 11, 2023, a delegation of REI, Inc. workers at the Ohio store formally filed for a union election with Region 8 of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) seeking representation with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU). This came on the heels of two stores winning their union elections in both the flagship SoHo, New York and in Berkeley, California stores. Despite REI, Inc.'s every effort to union bust coast-to-coast, workers yet again filed for a union election in Ohio.  Workers at the Ohio store hoped they wouldn't need to endure the same union busting campaign their colleagues on the coasts did, but union busting has already begun at the store, with workers being asked to join meetings as much as twice a day.  When successful, the RWDSU will represent approximately 55 current NLRA eligible workers in the Beachwood, Ohio store in contract negotiations. The store currently operates at a 60% staffing level of its full capacity, potentially increasing that number to over 70. The Union seeks to represent all non-supervisory employees at the store, which includes all full- and part-time sales specialists, technical specialists, visual presentation specialists, shipping and receiving specialists, certified technicians and mechanics, operations leads, sales leads, and shipping and receiving leads. Unless the Union and REI reach an election agreement, the Cleveland office of the NLRB will hold a hearing at 10 AM ET on February 3, 2023 by Zoom. Hearings are open to the public and members of the media can request viewing access from the NLRB’s Office of Public Information. # # # The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) represents 100,000 members throughout the United States, including 45,000 in New York State. The RWDSU is affiliated with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW). For more information, please visit our website at www.rwdsu.org, Facebook:/RWDSU.UFCW Twitter:@RWDSU.  

RWDSU STATEMENT ON DHS SECRETARY MAYORKAS ANNOUNCEMENT OF ENHANCED PROCEDURES FOR IMMIGRANT WORKER PROTECTIONS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 13, 2023 Contact: Chelsea Connor | [email protected] | 347-866-6259 RWDSU STATEMENT ON DHS SECRETARY MAYORKAS ANNOUNCEMENT OF ENHANCED PROCEDURES FOR IMMIGRANT WORKER PROTECTIONS “Today’s announcement by Secretary Mayorkas is welcome news. Immigrant workers are critical to the success of our economy, yet they are among those who suffer the most exploitation and abuse at work, and then suffer further from intimidation and retaliation when they stand up for their rights. These procedures for labor agencies to use to support workers in need of greater protections will allow workers to help with agency investigations without fear of threats and retaliation,” said Stuart Appelbaum, President of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU). # # # The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) represents 100,000 members throughout the United States. The RWDSU is affiliated with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW). For more information, please visit our website at www.rwdsu.org, Facebook:/RWDSU.UFCW Twitter:@RWDSU.  

RWDSU Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2023

This month, Americans everywhere salute the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. For members of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), Dr. King's legacy has special meaning. We take special pride that, in 1968, the RWDSU was the first union anywhere to negotiate a contract guaranteeing Dr. King's birthday as a paid holiday. The RWDSU was among the earliest supporters of Dr. King's grassroots drive to challenge racial injustice in the South.   In Chicago during the 1960s, RWDSU provided an important forum for Dr. King to speak out against poverty in America's cities.  Later, thousands of RWDSU members stood shoulder to shoulder with other Civil Rights Activists during the historic 1963 March on Washington. Dr. King saw the Civil Rights struggle and the labor movement as closely linked.  He was a constant ally of Union Activists and most have forgotten that Dr. King was in Tennessee to support a Living Wage for Sanitation Strikers on that terrible April day in 1968 when he was slain at the age of 39. Dr. King spoke about the importance of the Labor Movement on many occasions. "Our needs are identical with Labor's needs: decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing, old age security, and health and welfare measures, conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children, and respect in the community. That is why negroes support Labor's demands and fight laws which curb Labor. That is why the Labor-hater and the Labor-baiter is virtually always a twin-headed creature spewing anti-negro epithets from one mouth and anti-labor propaganda from the other mouth," Dr. King said in a speech in 1961. In reflecting on the life and work of Dr. King, the RWDSU recognizes the fight he began is not over until equality for all is a reality, and it is up to our generation of RWDSU members to complete his mission. Dr. King’s principles guide the RWDSU as we fight for economic, social, and racial justice in our ongoing organizing campaigns like that at REI Outdoor Sports, Amazon, and with New York’s farmworkers. Dr. King’s spirit lives on throughout the labor movement and everywhere people seek to create a more just and equal society for all of us. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (right) reviews an RWDSU contract with RWDSU Local 3 members employed at Bloomingdale's in New York City in the 1960s.

REI Cleveland, Ohio Workers File For Union Election

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 11, 2023 Contact: Chelsea Connor | [email protected] | 347-866-6259 REI CLEVELAND, OHIO WORKERS FILE FOR UNION ELECTION (CLEVELAND, OH) – Today, a delegation of REI, Inc. workers at the Cleveland, Ohio store formally filed for a union election with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) seeking representation with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU). This comes on the heels of two stores winning their union elections in both the flagship SoHo, New York store and in Berkeley, California. Despite REI, Inc.'s every effort to union bust coast-to-coast, workers have yet again filed for a union election.  This filing came just hours after REI, Inc. management refused to immediately voluntarily recognize the union. In the Wednesday morning huddle, a delegation of workers shared with management that a majority of workers had signed RWDSU authorization cards. With a majority of workers in favor of forming a union, workers asked REI, Inc. to voluntarily recognize the union so that contract negotiations could commence swiftly around a host of issues workers are facing at the sporting goods store, which is already at the table with workers at the SoHo, New York and Berkeley, California stores.  “100 years ago, it was coal miners; 70 years ago, it was auto workers; today, it's retail. The time for a union in every American workplace is now! We, the workers of REI Cleveland, are the ones customers come to when seeking firsthand knowledge and experience; we are the ones whose expertise drives the company's brick and mortar retail business, and it's time we the workers had a seat at the table. We weathered the pandemic and kept the company afloat, we stretched ourselves thin helping the company achieve its highest profit margin ever, and now we're being told that there aren't enough hours to go around due to corporate overbuying and recession fears. Enough. The American worker deserves better,” said Dave Hein (He/Him), Member of the REI Cleveland Organizing Committee and Bike Services and Ski Mechanic at REI, Inc. “It’s time that REI practices its values. At REI, we live by the phrase ‘a life outdoors is a life well lived’. Yet employees are not paid fair wages and have to deal with irregular scheduling preventing us from enjoying the great outdoors. With a Union, the green vests at REI Cleveland will have an opportunity to make our voices heard and make the store a better place for workers and the community we serve,” said Cloud Schneider (They/Them), Member of the REI Cleveland Organizing Committee and Visual Sales Lead at REI, Inc. The worker-led unionization effort in Cleveland, Ohio has been underway for well over a year, but workers cite the overwhelming win at REI, Inc. in SoHo, New York as having put the “battery in our backs” to push to a majority of card signers and file for election. On March 2, 2022 by an overwhelming majority vote of 86 percent, workers at the REI Co-Op in Manhattan, New York voted to join the RWDSU, making REI, Inc. SoHo, the first unionized REI, Inc. store in the nation. Despite enduring a union busting campaign that included captive audience meetings, a halt on promotional opportunities, and even a 25-minute union busting podcast, workers stood together to make REI Inc. the inclusive, progressive workplace it claims to be through their union. Workers at the Cleveland, Ohio store hope they won’t need to endure the same, and that their election date is set swiftly. When successful, the RWDSU will represent approximately 55 current NLRA eligible workers in the Cleveland, Ohio outdoor sports equipment company in contract negotiations. The store currently operates at a 60% staffing level of its full capacity, potentially increasing that number to over 70. The workers in the proposed bargaining unit include all full- and part-time sales specialists, technical specialists, visual presentation specialists, shipping and receiving specialists, certified technicians, operations leads, sales leads, and shipping and receiving leads. Pending the parties’ ability to come to a stipulated agreement swiftly and without the need for a hearing, the NLRB could set this election for as early as next month. More information about an election date and procedure will be available via the NLRB.  # # # The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) represents 100,000 members throughout the United States, including 45,000 in New York State. The RWDSU is affiliated with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW). For more information, please visit our website at www.rwdsu.org, Facebook:/RWDSU.UFCW Twitter:@RWDSU.  

REI Union Cleveland Recognition Demand Letter

We, the green vests of REI Cleveland, ask REI Coop to voluntarily recognize our Union and begin bargaining a Collective Agreement in good faith. If REI refuses, we will file for an election with the NLRB. We are organizing a union with RWDSU because we believe it is the most meaningful and effective way to ensure all voices are heard, and all employees supported. Organizing efforts at REI Cleveland began out of concern for our own health and safety during the earlier days of the COVID-19 pandemic, when REI initiated drastic new guidelines without any input from green vests in the stores. Masking guidelines were effectively eliminated as were other safety measures without our knowledge. As this pandemic has continued to teach us, our safety concerns must include concerns for the health and safety of our friends and family members that we must care for.  While the roots of this effort were born from these drastic changes that excluded our input, we have heard the concerns of our peers and it is clear that there is a need for systemic change. The following timely priorities are not exhaustive, all inclusive, or permanent: Staff and management are mostly homogenous at REI Cleveland which does not represent the communities in which we live or the diversity that surrounds us. REI continues to name Racial Equity Diversity and Inclusion (REDI) and racial justice as guiding principles, yet fails to support the recruitment and retention of Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC), or their growth at our store. We have lost peers and failed to recruit new green vests due to disappointing pay and poor scheduling. During the busiest season for retail, November and December, we had only 55 workers employed at our store, leaving us understaffed by over 1/3rd. With management giving no guarantee of hours, we were all scheduled at the bare minimum. Many of us green vests at the REI Cleveland location are working under 20 hours a week despite having provided REI with open availability. We have consistently been denied cross-training, which would help workers to fill in across departments when we’re understaffed.  Green vests working in frontline bear the brunt of customer frustration from a lack of workers to assist them on the floor. Overall, this chronic understaffing creates a less productive and more chaotic store environment for workers and customers alike. We were told that REI’s projected unprofitability was the reason for the reduction in hours which belies their rhetoric about placing employees first and underscores why it’s important that employees be at the table when business decisions are made. Until the recent “Way Forward” initiative was introduced, REI did not offer part-time employees health coverage until they had been on staff for 1 year, and only if they averaged 20 hours per week.  The new health insurance option now offered to all employees who are under the 20 hours/week threshold is not as robust as the full-time health plan. But since REI gives no guarantee for hours, there is no clear  path to becoming a full-time status staff person in order to receive those benefits. It is unclear what metric is used to evaluate our work performance. Management seems to rely heavily on membership conversions, but workers in back-of-house positions don’t have an equal opportunity to convert customers to members as staff on the sales floor. We strongly believe that all workers at REI Cleveland deserve not only a living wage, but a wage that recognizes and values the level of technical expertise green vests are expected to have. On top of the usual duties of a retail employee, green vests need to be able to offer members and customers gea complete  outfitting for their upcoming excursions, complete a pack fit, make gear suggestions, recommendations of outdoor locations, provide detailed specific product knowledge, and the ability to troubleshoot gear all while ensuring helping the the customer to be safe and  comfortable during their trip. When workers began organizing in February 2022 and brought a letter raising our concerns to management, we all received raises bringing us to $15/hr - but this was at the same time that the Co-oOp slashed payroll budgets, leading to reduced hours and loss of income. Recently, as a result of REI workers organizing in the SoHo flagship location, REI unveiled "The Way Forward," enacting pay raises bringing us to $16.65/hr. The initiative also promised that pay raises would be discussed quarterly, but so far this has not happened in our store. Around the same time that REI touted its “The Way Forward” benefits, our bonuses were cut, apparently due to revenue shortfalls. Despite the fact that REI Cleveland outperformed our revised revenue goal, we’ve heard no promise that our full bonuses would be reinstated.  Much of what we described points to a lack of transparency since opening in 2018. We are looking for more clearly defined systems and expectations within performance reviews, health and safety protocols, and accountability for our peers and managers. We deserve to be informed about how decisions affecting our work and our livelihoods are made, and believe that our voices should be heard, recognized and valued. Green vests are facing ongoing issues in the store, such as our recurring plumbing problem at the REI Cleveland location, without any clear path to solving them. With a union, we can sit down with management and address these issues head-on.  We love what we do. We love working with the members and customers who walk into REI Cleveland every day. With consistency in pay and benefits and a union voice, we’ll be able to better support our members and customers. REI believes that “A Life Outdoors is a Life Well Lived” and as green vests in REI Cleveland, we believe it’s made better with a union. Unionizing is a part of a healthy lifestyle. We at REI Cleveland ask REI to courageously embrace change, and voluntarily recognize our efforts to form a union at REI store #168 when we file with the National Labor Relations Board. We also call on REI to cease and desist from union busting techniques. We reject the now-defunct website used to spread lies to green vests at SoHo and Berkeley, and the intimidation tactics deployed by management at REI Cleveland when we initially raised our concerns last year. Here at the Co-op we always come from a place of respect and we ask that you do the same. We are united and join in the words of REI Union SoHo: “We are united in change—fighting for better working conditions and a life outside!” 

Michigan Pickle Producers Relish New Contract Improvements

If you’ve enjoyed Vlasic products lately like pickles, relish, and pickle spears or chips, there’s a good chance they were produced by RWDSU Local 87 members in Imlay City, Michigan. In December, the Vlasic/Conagra workers ratified a new four-year agreement that significantly increases pay. All regular full-time employees with receive up to 25 percent wage increases. The next three years of the contract, workers will receive between 50 and 75 cents per hour increases. The Negotiating Committee also fought hard to protect the health care plan benefits, and also won reduced costs for the Family Plan. There are 400 year-round workers employed at Vlasic on a year-round basis, and the number swells to over 500 during the April-December season. Serving on the Negotiating Committee were: Mitch Pressel, Mindy Salcedo, RWDSU Rep. Joe Silva, Local 87 President Craig Welch, RWDSU Rep. Fred Jimenez, Nina Platz and Warren Tripp. Negotiating Committee members celebrate the new Vlasic Pickle contract. (l to r) Mitch Pressel, Mindy Salcedo, RWDSU Rep. Joe Silva, Local 87 President Craig Welch, RWDSU Rep. Fred Jimenez. Not present for photo were Nina Platz and Warren Tripp.

STATEMENT ON THE PASSAGE OF THE WAREHOUSE WORKERS PROTECTION ACT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 25, 2022  Contact: Chelsea Connor | [email protected] | 347-866-6259 STATEMENT ON THE PASSAGE OF THE WAREHOUSE WORKER PROTECTION ACT   (NEW YORK, NY) – Unsafe work speeds, unreasonable work quotas, dangerous work, and insufficient breaks all contribute to the skyrocketing rate of injuries and sickness in the warehousing industry, which is why the RWDSU pushed for the introduction of the Warehouse Worker Protection Act (WWPA – A10020/S8922) this year. Today, the critically needed WWPA was signed into law by Governor Kathy Hochul. The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), issued the following statement:  “Regulations protecting workers in the warehousing industry have lagged far behind its rapid growth until today. The RWDSU has long prioritized the challenge of protecting warehouse workers from stress induced injuries and illness from limitless quotas and it’s why we pushed for the introduction of the Warehouse Worker Protection Act (WWPA – A10020/S8922) this year. “Warehouse facilities are popping up across New York at staggering numbers; Amazon alone has opened more than 70 facilities in the state and over half of those facilities have been built since January 2021. At the same time, we have seen increased stress, pain, and resulting safety issues for warehouse workers, due to increased quotas and speeds. Due to extreme, unknown and unreasonable work quotas warehouse workers have suffered heart attacks, strokes, repetitive motion injuries, and irreparable life-long joint and back pain. At Amazon, the injury rate is 54% higher than the average rate for the state’s warehousing industry – and even that is a staggering misrepresentation of the reality given how many injuries at Amazon go unreported.  “Today, we’ve achieved a big win for workers’ safety. Thank you to the bill sponsors New York State Senator Jessica Ramos and Assemblymember Latoya Joyner for their leadership on this commonsense health and safety bill, the NYS legislature for passing this critical safety measure, and Governor Kathy Hochul for signing it into law today. The WWPA can start helping workers who need it now more than ever,” said Stuart Appelbaum, President of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU).  BACKGROUND ON (WWPA – A10020/S8922): Modeled after similar legislation signed into law in California last year, the WWPA will help protect workers from inhumane quotas – quotas that have caused workers lifelong injuries and outrageously, in some cases, their lives. The law will require that quotas, which are oftentimes completely unknown to workers, be transparent. And it will prevent workers from being disciplined if they fail to achieve these quotas due to the worker meeting basic human needs like bathroom and water breaks. Research shows that many of these injuries and illnesses are preventable and are the result of mismanagement that prioritizes speed and productivity for profits over workers’ safety. The WWPA creates important boundaries to protect warehouse industry workers from the brutal line speeds and quotas that are driving injuries and sickness at New York’s warehouses.  # # # The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) represents 100,000 members throughout the United States. The RWDSU is affiliated with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW). For more information, please visit our website at www.rwdsu.org, Facebook:/RWDSU.UFCW Twitter:@RWDSU.

Amazon, recognize your workers’ humanity!

by STUART APPELBAUM President, Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union December 7, 2022 Amazon’s continued mistreatment of workers sparked huge protests across the globe on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, with workers and activists at 140 actions in more than 40 countries bringing attention to the company’s appalling, dehumanizing and abusive behavior.  The Make Amazon Pay campaign—an international union-led coalition of labor, progressive and activist organizations—is holding Amazon to account for treating workers as disposable commodities, for its environmental policies and for failing to pay its taxes. The campaign is leading actions such as those on Black Friday to demand Amazon raise worker pay, create safer workplaces, extend sick leave, provide job security, end union busting, respect workers’ rights and operate sustainably. The campaign is also demanding that Amazon pay back to society by paying its taxes in full and ending its abuse of tax loopholes.   Protests, demonstrations and walkouts worldwide focused on how Amazon exploits workers and hurts communities. Workers at 18 distribution centers in France and Germany went on strike. In St. Peters, Missouri, Amazon workers walked off the job at the STL8 distribution center. At the Amazon distribution center in Bessemer, Alabama, where employees have been trying to unionize with the RWDSU since 2020, workers joined community groups and other unions including striking Alabama mine workers in a show of solidarity. And in New York City, dozens of activists protested outside of Jeff Bezos’ $23 million luxury apartment, demanding the Amazon chief’s attention. Amazon workers endure unsafe work speeds, unreasonable work quotas, dangerous work and insufficient breaks, all of which contribute to the skyrocketing rate of injuries in the industry. Workers’ productivity is monitored so closely that they are afraid to take bathroom breaks. In New York, the warehouse industry has alarmingly high injury rates. Amazon workers are injured at a rate of six per 100, which is five times the average in New York. While all warehouse work is dangerous, Amazon warehouse workers are 54% more likely than others in the industry to get sick or hurt on the job. It’s a matter of decency, morality and often literally, life and death. We want Amazon to listen, and we want Amazon to change. Workers from New York to Alabama and from Leipzig to New Delhi want better pay, safer workplaces and a voice at work. Most of all, they want dignity and respect, and to be treated like humans from a company that can afford to change the way it operates. You can also read the column in New York Amsterdam News.